6 Things I Wish I Had Known About Communicating With Parents

6 Things I Wish I Had Known About Communicating With Parents
  1. They love to hear good things about their child! Always make a positive comment about the child during pick-up time. Report how the child engaged, something cute they said, or how you noticed an improvement on an issue that you had previously discussed with the parent.
  1. Follow up conversations where action steps were discussed to confirm what was decided. This simply gives both parties an opportunity to clarify in case there has been any miscommunication.
  1. Get any information out about upcoming events or expectations at six different times in a variety of ways. Send out a Facebook message telling parents their child will receive information this Sunday about ______, then briefly state the info. Follow this by a detailed written note that can be placed on the fridge. Send out email reminders. Text the day before the event and say, “See you tomorrow evening!”
  1. After a program or event, follow up with the child in some way so the parent knows their child’s presence was acknowledged. “We missed you” is appropriate occasionally, but don’t reward absence with your attention as much as noticing when they are there.
  1. Involve each parent in some way. This raises the importance of your communication on their radar because they are invested…even if it’s a seemingly small responsibility.
  1. Ask parents how you can pray for them. When you genuinely approach parents repeatedly about praying for their specific needs, they will open up and take your relationship to a more intimate level.

This article originally appeared here.

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Tina Houser
After 33 incredible years in children’s ministry within the local church, Tina is now part of the KidzMatter team as Executive Editor of KidzMatter Magazine and Senior Publications Director, writing the This iKnow kids’ church curriculum. With great enthusiasm, she gallivants all over the country to train those who share her passion for reaching kids for the Kingdom. Tina has authored 12 books, one of which is used as a textbook in some universities (but it’s not boring, really).