Mythbuster’s Adam Savage: ‘The Internet Hates Women’ and Why He’s Warning His Sons About Porn

Adam Savage

Adam Savage, co-host of Discovery TV’s hit show Mythbusters, is an aggressively left-brained, scientific method-loving personality. So it’s no surprise that when it comes to parenting, Savage talks about his twin kids’ brains like they’re computers.

“I have been worried since before my twins were born about what sort of people they’ll become,” Savage said recently on The Moth podcast. “Only about 10 percent of the code their brain is running is mine, and I have no idea WHICH 10 percent. They’re like dogs when they’re young: You accept the behavior you’re willing to live with you reject the behavior you’re not and there’s a lot of fluid cleanup,” Savage says in his characteristic joking style.

But as Savage’s kids grew older, the parenting challenges increased. After one of his kids was caught looking up pornography on the computer, Savage realized he was facing a crucial moment in his kid’s life.

Savage recounts a conversation with his kid in the car, telling him “Listen, what you did is totally reasonable. Being curious about what people look like naked is a rational and normal response to the world and it is a reasonable curiosity to have, and I’m not mad.”

He went on to tell his son, though, that the decisions he would make now, as a 10-year-old, would shape the rest of his life.

“So I talked to him about what he saw, and what he felt about what he saw,” Savage recounts. “But what I’m thinking about is the 800-pound gorilla in the room which is not what he saw, but what he’s going to see. So I tell him, ‘You have to be careful out there. It’s normal to be curious, but your curiosity is going to pay off with some unexpected dividends pretty quickly.’

“There’s some really awful stuff out there. And I see in his eyes a curiosity and I’m thinking ‘that’s NOT what I want!’ So I tell him you’ll see things you’ll never be able to unsee that will stick in your brain and ruin moments for you because they’ll show up later. And now I see fear in his eyes. And he’s 10 at this point and I’m still reasonably omnipotent to him and I realize I’ve maybe scared him away from the Internet for a year, but not much longer than that. So how am I going to prepare him for what he eventually sees?”

Savage says he realized this conversation with his son was a pivotal moment, and that cultural change in our country begins with conversations just like this one. At that moment Savage knew what he had to say:

“I told him, ‘The thing you have to understand, bud, is that the internet hates women.’ And I realize some of you think that’s an incredibly broad brush to paint the Internet with, but let me put it this way: If you could look into someone’s brain the way you search the Internet and the Internet is a dude, that dude has a problem with women.”

Savage’s point is profound. As the anti-porn group Fight the New Drug thoroughly points out, pornography is a deeply harmful societal problem, specifically in how it promotes the objectification, degradation and abuse of women. On their website, Fight the New Drug explains, “It might seem a little crazy at first to think about, but read this: A few years ago, a team of researchers looked at 50 of the most popular porn films—the ones bought and rented most often. Of the 304 scenes the movies contained, 88 percent contained physical violence and 49 percent contained verbal aggression. On average, only one scene in 10 didn’t contain any aggression, and the typical scene averaged 12 physical or verbal attacks. The amount of violence shown in porn is astonishing, but equally disturbing is the reaction of the victims. In the study, 95 percent of the victims (almost all of them women) either were neutral to the abuse or appeared to respond with pleasure.”

As society catches up to the damaging effects of pornography, it’s increasingly agreeing with what Christianity has said all along: Pornography is damaging to relationships, degrading to women, and acts like a spiritual cancer that kills intimacy. Savage, who is an atheist, understands this, and is hoping to guide his kids toward a better life.

“I realized this [understanding of pornography] is the code I want to run in my kid’s brain, and he’s old enough to run it. I want him to realize that if he’s not a part of the solution, he’s part of the problem. And I want him to think when he’s talking to women ‘I’m one of the good ones.’”

Previous articleYes Christian, You Need the Church
Next articleJen Hatmaker, et al Announce Cancelation of 2017 Belong Tour
Joshua Pease
Josh Pease is a writer & speaker living in Colorado with his wife and two kids. His e-book, The God Who Wasn't There , is available for purchase on Amazon.