The Summit Booklist! 7 Must-Reads

Do you want the best notes, tweets and Summit experience at the Global Leadership Summit? Read these books and get a head start on the 2015 Summit. #crushedit

While everyone else is frantically taking notes and tweeting and tagging, you can take a deep breath and be more present in the moment. #win

So, get your notebook, iPad or laptop ready. If you’re a hipster Christian, don your favorite skinny jeans, layered v-neck and plaid shirt with your trendy shoes and finish it off with a shiny GLS lanyard. #fancy

christ

So, allow me to present to you this year’s reading list based on the Summit speaker line up. #yourewelcome

simpify

  1. Simplify by Bill Hybels

“Who do you want to become? Simplicity cannot be achieved without clarity about the big-picture target of your life. To create a schedule that reflects your most important life goals, you must begin with the right question. The question isn’t, “What do I want to get done in the next thirty days?” but, “Who do I want to become in this next season of my life?”

good2great

  1. Good to Great by Jim Collins

“People can learn skills and acquire knowledge, but they cannot learn the essential character traits that make them right for your organization.”

create

  1. Creativity, Inc by Ed Catmull

“And I’ve heard people refer to Pixar’s production group as a finely tuned locomotive that they would love the chance to drive. What interests me is the number of people who believe that they have the ability to drive the train and who think that this is the power position—that driving the train is the way to shape their companies’ futures. The truth is, it’s not. Driving the train doesn’t set its course. The real job is laying the track.”

give

  1. Give and Take by Adam Grant

“The art of advocacy is to lead you to my conclusion on your terms.”

daring

  1. Daring Greatly by Brene Brown

“Vulnerability sounds like truth and feels like courage. Truth and courage aren’t always comfortable, but they’re never weakness.”

feed

  1. Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen

“It doesn’t matter how much authority or power a feedback giver has; the receivers are in control of what they do and don’t let in, how they make sense of what they’re hearing, and whether they choose to change.”

rookie

  1. Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work by Liz Wiseman

“When we linger too long on a plateau, a little part of us dies inside. When we step onto a learning curve we feel alive again.”

What speaker are you most looking forward to at the Summit this year?

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Esther Laurie
Esther Laurie is a staff writer at ChurchLeaders.com. Her background is in communication and church ministry. She believes in the power of the written word and the beauty of transformation and empowering others. When she’s not working, she loves running, exploring new places and time with friends and family. It’s her goal to work the word ‘whimsy’ into most conversations.