Home Pastors Articles for Pastors Why We Try to Hide Our Imperfections (and Why We Shouldn’t)

Why We Try to Hide Our Imperfections (and Why We Shouldn’t)

Why We Try to Hide Our Imperfections (And Why We Shouldn’t)

A few months ago, a young woman I’ve known all her life looked at me and said, “What’s that on your face?”

She’s the bold, outspoken type, so her question didn’t shock me, but I said, “What particular blemish are you talking about?”

“The hole in your cheek!”

“Oh, you mean the pockmark?”

Suddenly it dawned on her; I just pointed out a pitted scar left by a pimple on my pastor’s face!

I chuckled and said, “It’s okay, I embrace my flaws.”

Awkward for her.

Not so much for me.

Why do we try to hide our imperfections? It’s a great question.

Perhaps it’s because we fear rejection. Maybe it’s that we think more highly of ourselves than we ought. Of course, we could just be afraid of scaring small children.

Whatever the reason, there is a freedom that comes in our relationships when we know we are loved regardless of our flaws.

Frankly, at my age, you do one of two things when it comes to your appearance:

• Spend a lot of time and money on hiding your blemishes.

• Accept the reality that you are far from perfect and it’s okay.

I choose to accept my imperfections.

One of my favorite Brennan Manning quotes is, “Be who you is, or you is who you ain’t.”

In other words, when we try to be something or somebody we are not, we compromise and lose who we truly are.

I have scars.

Blemishes.

Thinning, silver hair and a growing belly.

Of course, I bathe, shave, apply deodorant, floss, and attempt to exercise and watch what I eat. By no means am I suggesting we just let ourselves go.

However…

No matter what I do, I still have scars, spots, warts and a pockmark or two. As long as I’m in this earth-suit, I must face the reality of an aging and less-than-perfect body (and mind, obviously).

It’s been a long time since someone has called me eye candy.

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kurtbubna@gmail.com'
Kurt Bubna is the founding and senior pastor of Eastpoint Church in Spokane Valley, WA. Bubna published his first book, Epic Grace ~ Chronicles of a Recovering Idiot, with Tyndale Momentum in 2013. He is an author of five other books, an active blogger, itinerate speaker, and a regular radio personality. He and his wife, Laura, have been married for over forty years and have four grown children and eight grandchildren.