Home Pastors Pastor Blogs How Killing Your Ideas Makes Them Better

How Killing Your Ideas Makes Them Better

Sometimes, I try to kill my own ideas.

Especially with an idea that has major consequences for change and potential.

I brought it to the table.

I believe in it.

I want it to happen.

I got people excited about it.

I energized the team.

Now I’m attempting to kill it.

I’m trying to find holes in the idea.

I am questioning the validity of the idea.

I’m even causing some to ask if I still support the idea.

My idea.

What’s my point?

Am I that difficult as a leader?

Well, that may be a matter of opinion, but I have a good reason.

I want the idea to stand the test of time and scrutiny.

If it survives, it has a better chance of succeeding.

If it doesn’t, well, let’s move on to a new idea.

As a leader, I’ve learned I can often get excited about my own ideas. I can get other people excited about my ideas…I can pitch an impressive vision…I can motivate people to say yes to my suggestions.

Whether because of position or power of persuasion, I have the ability to excite people around a cause. I can even find ways to justify my idea, even, if necessary, make it appear it was a “God-given” idea.

The bottom line is I’m capable of being wrong. I’m capable of some really bad ideas. I’m even capable of justifying my personal idea as a “God-idea.” Just being honest.

When an idea hasn’t been tested thoroughly before it meets the vote of the public and it fails, it puts a strain against my credibility as a leader. If it has been tested, questioned, and kicked around thoroughly, especially among the team I lead, it has the full support of everyone from the beginning, actually starts to feel like their idea, and has a better chance of succeeding.

Have a great idea?

Be the first to try to kill it and see if it’s worth pushing forward.

If it passes the test, you’ve got the potential of a great idea.

Have you ever tried to kill one of your own ideas?

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Ron Edmondson is a pastor and church leader passionate about planting churches, helping established churches thrive, and assisting pastors and those in ministry think through leadership, strategy and life. Ron has over 20 years business experience, mostly as a self-employed business owner, and he's been helping churches grow vocationally for over 10 years.