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Critical Theory and Precursors to Approaching Critical Race Theory

3. Critical race theory includes a number of individuals and is an evolving discipline.

It is important that CRT is not perceived as a monolith, “As these writings demonstrate, there is no canonical set of doctrines or methodologies to which we all subscribe.”[6] It is also important to recognize that CRT continues to evolve. Both the diversity and constant evolution of CRT is a warning to Christians to use clarity and specificity when expressing his or her support for CRT. Those who are anti–CRT should be sure to present the nuance of the discipline and not choose the most extreme theorists as a representative of the discipline to discredit the movement.

To close this article, I want to offer Christians a few admonishments.

Be charitable in your dialogue. Don’t villainize those you disagree with. Be consistent in your application of common grace. Use sola scriptura accurately. And finally, love God and love people.

Read the Complete Critical Race Theory Series

Part 1: Framing Critical Race Theory 

Part 2: What Is CRT and Should We Be Concerned? 

Part 3: Cautions Regarding Critical Race Theory

Part 4: Cautions Regarding Critical Race Theory II

Part 5: A Missiological Assessment of Critical Race Theory

Part 6: A Missiological Assessment of Critical Race Theory II

Part 7. A Missiological Assessment of Critical Race Theory III

Part 8: A Missiological Assessment of Critical Race Theory IV

Part 9: Sociological Theory and Precursors to Approaching Critical Race Theory

Part 10: Critical Theory and Precursors to Approaching Critical Race Theory

Part 11: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical Ethics

 


[1] John J. Macionis, Sociology, 15th Edition (Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2014), 22.

[2] Vern S. Poythress, Redeeming Sociology (Wheaton: Crossway, 2011) 285.

[3] It should be noted that critical sociology is a research orientation utilized by critical theorist.

[4] John J. Macionis, Sociology, 15th Edition (Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2014), 41.

[5] Dino Franco Felluga, Critical Theory: The Key Concepts (New York: Routledge, 2015), Introduction, Xxiii.

[6] Kimberele Crenshaw et al., eds., Critical Race Theory: The Key Writings That Formed the Movement (New York: The New Press, 1995), Introduction, xiii.

Further Sources:

Delgado, Richard and Harris, Angela. Critical Race Theory: An Introduction. 3rd ed. New York: New York University Press, 2017.

Denzin, Norman K., ed. The Values of Social Science. United States: Aldine. 1970.

Gilbert, Nigel, ed. Researching Social Life. California: New Sage, 1993.

Kendall, Diana. Social Problems in a Diverse Society. 5th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2012.

Denzin, Norman K., ed. The Values of Social Science. United States: Aldine. 1970.

Royce, Edward. Classical Social Theory and Modern Society: Marx, Durkheim, Weber. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015.

 

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Sherelle Ducksworth is a native of Clarksdale, Mississippi and currently serves as a sociology instructor at Louisburg College in Louisburg, North Carolina. She earned an AA degree in general education from Coahoma Community college, her B.A. degree in sociology from Mississippi Valley State University, her M.S. degree in sociology with a concentration on social stratification from Mississippi State University, her M.A. in theology from Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary and is currently working on a Ph.d in systematic theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Her and her husband Aaron currently live in Wake Forest, North Carolina and attend Christ Our King Community Church in Raleigh, North Carolina.