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Why Leading Worship Includes the Whole Band

2. Smile Big.

Your countenance says a ton about how you feel about God.

For example, if you look bored, you are communicating that God is boring. It makes no sense to sing about how great and awesome God is with a smoldering scowl on your face.

On the other hand, if you are delighting in God, people will see it in your countenance and know that God is a God to be delighted in. I’m not saying fake a cheesy grin, but I am saying, let your enjoyment of God show.

Obviously you should use wisdom … For example, if you’re singing a lament of repentance, a smile might not be fitting, but let your countenance reflect what you are singing.

3. Show Adoration.

True adoration is not limited to our songs and our faces. The idea of loving God with all your strength is using your entire body to express adoration to God.

So while you are likely to have your hands occupied for the majority of the songs, try to find moments to raise your hands and worship in other full-body-type ways. You are an example for the church of what is appropriate expression of praise, adoration and thanksgiving to God.

So don’t just stand there petrified like a statue — move around.

Musicians, we are on the platform to worship and lead worship, not just to play music. So let’s do everything we can to do this well for the glory of Christ.

Questions for reflection: 

As a church musician, do you see yourself as a leader of worship? Why or why not?

As a musician seeking to lead your congregation in worship, are there things you would add to this list?  

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stephenmiller@churchleaders.com'
Stephen Miller serves as pastor of worship arts at The Journey in St Louis and just released his new book Worship Leaders, We Are Not Rock Stars, and worship album, All Hail the King. He writes regularly at www.stephen-miller.com, and you can find him on Twitter @StephenMiller and on Facebook at Facebook.com/StephenMillerMusic.