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Why We Stopped Singing About the Return of Christ … and Why It’s a Problem

Our Final Hope

“Amen. Come, Lord Jesus.” All believers ought to remember that the church’s final hope is a person. It is neither a political party nor is it a pragmatic paradigm. It is not a popular program. It’s a person. And what a person he is.

Jesus is the greatest person who has ever lived, because he is God himself who lived a perfect human life. He is the most powerful (Mark 4:41) person who ever lived. Even on the cross, Augustine wrote, Jesus “endured death as a lamb; he devoured it as a lion.” Therefore, Christ’s prayer, and the ultimate goal of our lives, is to bask in his glorious presence:

“Father, I desire that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory that you have given me because you loved me before the foundation of the world.” (John 17:24)

Our Risen Lord

“Amen. Come, Lord Jesus.” All believers ought to remember that this person, Jesus Christ, is not like any other person that we know. He is the Lord.

His death displayed his sovereign rule. No one took his life from him, but he laid it down of his own accord (John 10:18). How much more will his second coming display his sovereign rule.

Our Great Desire

“Amen. Come, Lord Jesus.” All believers ought to remember that because Jesus is Lord, and not under our control, the timing and manner of his appearing cannot be our decision.

When he comes, he will come in his own time and in his own way. The Bible tells us that his coming will be accompanied. He will not be alone, for “the Son of Man comes in his glory and all the angels with him” (Matthew 25:31).

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matthewwesterholm@churchleaders.com'
Matthew Westerholm (@mwesterholm) serves at Bethlehem Baptist Church as a pastor for worship and music. He lives in Minneapolis with his wife, Lisa, and their three sons.