Can an INTROVERT Really Be a Pastor?

4. Be transparent about your introversion.

Church members will understand you better. Many will be more forgiving about some of the introvert’s more annoying traits.

Some will identify with you and be glad you were willing to address your introversion publicly.

5. Use the power of social media to be your voice.

Introverts don’t like small talk conversation, but they typically don’t mind writing.

The more people can “see” you on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or a blog, the more they will feel like they know you, even though you don’t have one-on-one interaction with them.

6. Be accountable to an extrovert.

I still am today, even though I no longer serve as a pastor.

He reminds me of when I am sinking into extreme introversion. He sees me when I don’t see myself. He tells me how my actions or lack of actions may be perceived.

7. Book time on your calendar to recover.

If you have been expending lots of energy mingling, counseling or socializing, you need some down time to recover. Put it on your calendar so you can be intentional about it.

And, for an hour or so, go to a place by yourself. Read, relax or do nothing. No one is there to talk to you for those minutes. Enjoy your blessed aloneness for a brief season.

Are you an introverted pastor?

How do you handle your introversion in an extroverted world?

How have other introverted pastors dealt with their situations?  

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Thom Rainer
Thom S. Rainer is the president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources (LifeWay.com). Among his greatest joys are his family: his wife Nellie Jo; three sons, Sam, Art, and Jess; and six grandchildren. He was founding dean of the Billy Graham School of Missions, Evangelism, and Church Growth at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. His many books include Surprising Insights from the Unchurched, The Unexpected Journey, and Breakout Churches.