Releasing People to Get Counseling, and to Counsel

Some of the spiritually healthiest people I know are in counseling. There seems to be some stigma around it, but getting help with our mental and emotional issues is really a matter of choosing to grow with the help of others. And the New Testament reveals a pretty neat idea in the mind of God … the church can be a growing body of compassionate counselors. If you’re a Christian, you need counseling from other Christians, and you need to offer counseling to others too.

I believe there is a huge need for professional counseling in the culture in which we live, and there are times for all of us when the the healthiest thing we can do is pay to see a clinician trained in the art of coaching us toward healthier thinking and relationships. But there is also a vast army of counselors within the membership of the church.

Paul challenged Christians to “teach and counsel each other with all the wisdom he gives” (Colossians 3:16 NLT). He challenged us to admonish and to encourage, to hold others accountable, to help apply biblical truth and to make each other healthier, mutually.

When I was a pastor at Saddleback Church, I was amazed at the number of people who had gone through extensive training under Pastor Bob Baker to become lay counselors. One of those trainees even wound up living in northwest Arkansas and joined my church. Saddleback’s website describes the approach this way:

We produce trained counselors who facilitate a free service for individuals seeking guidance for a variety of issues including marital and family relationships, communication and intimacy, parenting, grief and loss, anger and bitterness, inner personal struggles, and spiritual discouragement. Our volunteers receive extensive training, ongoing supervision and continuing education. The ministry helps fulfill Pastor Rick’s vision for Saddleback Church: “It is the dream of a place where the hurting, the depressed, the frustrated and the confused can find love, acceptance, help, hope, forgiveness, guidance and encouragement.”

It’s an incredible approach that meets real needs for thousands. My wife, Angie, leads our church’s counseling efforts. She’s a trained clinician (LCSW) with a background in offering professional therapy. But she also believes strongly in the power of releasing non-professional lay counselors to walk alongside the broken.

And I would get even more ground-level in my assessment of the church’s need to counsel and to be counseled. We also need an informal atmosphere where people connect with others in small groups, and in one-on-one or two-or-three-sized groups to talk about life, to heal from brokenness and to deepen one another’s walk.

God has certainly equipped us for this.

  • He’s given us His Word, the Bible, which is His verbally inspired truth for life, infallible and unable to fail as it works its way through our lives.
  • He’s given us His Spirit, to lead us in the moment, to feed us life-giving words to share with others, on the spot.
  • He’s allowed us to walk our own broken roads while learning to draw closer to Him so that we can speak out of our own pain into the lives of others.
1
2
Previous article7 Tensions You Can Expect in Fast Growth
Next articlePsalm 23: The Lord Is Our Shepherd
Brandon Cox
Brandon Cox is Lead Pastor of Grace Hills Church, a new church plant in northwest Arkansas. He also serves as Editor and Community Facilitator for Pastors.com and Rick Warren's Pastor's Toolbox and was formerly a Pastor at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California. In his spare time, he offers consultation to church leaders about communication, branding, and social media. He and his wife, Angie, live with their two awesome kids in Bentonville, Arkansas.

Get the ChurchLeaders Daily Sent to Your Inbox