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Don’t Make These 7 Common Church Website Mistakes

Earlier, we posted a blog about things that should never be found on church Web sites. To add to the conversation, here are the 7 most common church Web site mistakes we experience as we comb through thousands of Web sites a year.

Take the test: how many of these mistakes are you making?

1.  Nothing New.

This is the most common mistake. No matter the size or budget, most churches struggle to update their sites regularly.

Unfortunately, this is what’s communicated to the few people that visit the Web site: “We aren’t updating our Web site because we aren’t doing anything important/noteworthy.” No doubt that isn’t the truth, but that’s the message.

Visitors should have the expectation that your site will be updated with noteworthy content regularly. How regularly? Start with a monthly commitment with the ultimate goal of weekly updates.

2.  Buried Contact Information.

When and where you worship are probably the two most important and often most neglected facts missing on a church’s site.

Don’t bury this information. It should be front and center.

3.  Not Visitor-Centric.

Conduct a quick audit of your site, and you will likely find that you have neglected the visitor/non-member.

Welcome videos and visitor pages are a great start, but all content should pass the visitor litmus test.

Here’s the test: “Would this make sense and is this important to someone who is not a member?” If it doesn’t pass that test, then you should go back to the drawing board.

4.  Emphasis on Buildings.

Sure, your building is an important tool for transforming the lives of people through the power of the Gospel, but your Web site should focus on transformed lives and people—not pictures of bricks and mortar.

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paulloyless@churchleaders.com'
I love the Church. As the CEO of d2design, I work to equip the church on mission through innovative church marketing strategies. I have spent over a decade working with pastors and church leadership, helping them discover the most effective ways to connect with their communities.