20 Questions to Ask at the End of Your Rope

If you’re at the end of your rope, there are some important questions you need to ask yourself:

1. What is the other end of this rope tied to? 

2. Where is this rope supposed to be taking me? 

3. Is it tied to the right things, the right values?

4. Am I sure I’m at the end of my rope or do I just feel that way? 

5. Is it possible there’s still more rope beneath me, but I’m too afraid to look down?

6. Why do I feel I’m at the end of my rope?

7. Am I losing my grip because I’ve been working so hard at climbing under my own power?

8. Who told me I’m supposed to climb this rope anyway? 

9. Is it possible this rope-climbing activity is a waste of my precious time?

10. Do I really feel safer holding onto this rope? 

11. Is there something better in life than rope-climbing?

12. How many people die, still clutching their ropes?

13. What would happen if I let go of the rope I’m clinging to? 

14. Who would catch me if I let go? 

15. Haven’t I heard an encouraging voice: “Let go. Come to me you who are tired of climbing. I will catch you and hold you and give you rest”? 

16. Do I trust that I will be caught and never let go?

17. What will life be like if I’m not holding onto this rope?

18. Do I trust my death grip on this rope more than the one who will catch me if I let go?

19. Who will help me let go and encourage me in my catcher? 

20. What will it take to let go, to release this and throw my hands up in surrender? 

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Mike Mack
Michael C. Mack founded SmallGroups.com in 1995 and served as a small-groups minister for more than 20 years in several churches. He is a writer, editor, trainer, and consultant in the areas of small groups, leadership, and discipleship. He is the author of more than 25 books and small group studies, including his latest, World's Greatest Small Group (pub. January, 2017). He regularly blogs on his ministry website at SmallGroupLeadership.com. His family is a small group that includes his wife Heidi, their four children, and their dog, Lainey. Mike is also an avid mountain biker.