On July 4th Sunday: Be Careful Using Militaristic Language in the Church

Something we invariably witness on July 4th Sunday is video on the wide screens at some churches featuring fighter jets, soldiers, and waving flags. Yes – Jesus used militaristic language in the New Testament. As the Park Forum devotional puts it: “In a time when Galilee already had a powerful and dangerous ruler (Herod Antipas), Jesus was a revolutionary. When Jesus spoke of his purpose and mission, he often used war-like language. For example, in Matthew 10, he said, “Do not think that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I have not come to bring peace, but a sword.”” But what we can’t forget isthat Jesus wasn’t advocating a physical battle, he spoke as a warrior-king in a spiritual war. The battle Jesus calls us to fight is in another dimension.

And that battle against sin never stops. There is never any rest when it comes to that fight. But as Ephesians 6:12 says, “For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.”

This July 4th, let’s celebrate the ultimate freedom found in Jesus, and lay off the culture war rhetoric. Besides, truth be told, my greatest battles aren’t with others, they’re with me.

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Phil Cooke
Phil Cooke is the founder and CEO of Cooke Pictures in Burbank, California (cookepictures.com)where he helps church, ministry, and nonprofit organizations engage the culture more effectively. He's a filmmaker, media consultant, and author of "Unique: Telling Your Story in the Age of Brands and Social Media."