How Great Is Our God

May all who seek you rejoice and be glad in you; may those who love your salvation say continually, “Great is the LORD!” (Psalm 40:16)

Great is an important word. We use it to talk about something of unusually large size: A great earthquake shook the city. Or a large number: A great crowd filled the stadium. Or unusual power or intensity: She has experienced great pain. Or something that is especially good or wonderful: He is a great player. Or something in an extreme degree: For a long time, we have been great friends.

Not only is the word great flexible—used in five different ways above, to talk about size, number, intensity, goodness and degree—but it’s also a powerful word. Or at least it used to be. It’s become an easy word to overuse. When day after day is great, and meal after meal is great, and game after game is great, we begin to lose the punch of the word to talk about our wedding day, or an unusually lavish feast, or the championship game that went into overtime.

Reclaim the Word Great

And what about God? The Bible tells us again and again, especially in the Psalms, that our God is great. If we use the word great for the normal and everyday, what language will we have when we need to describe the day or the meal or the game that really is a cut above the typical—or most importantly, the God who really is infinite above all else?

One wonderful thing about this song is that it helps us reclaim the word great. Using simple, but profound language, “How Great Is Our God” turns our attention to the greatness of God. It sets God before us as our standard of true greatness. Perhaps when God increasingly becomes our standard of what is great, then we’ll increasingly become more careful with how easily we dish out the word for days and meals and games.

And just as the word great is flexible and can refer to size, number, intensity, goodness and degree, so this song gives us several glimpses into the greatness of God.

Four Glimpses Into His Greatness

First is the greatness of his majesty and kingly glory. His is the splendor of a king—not just the king of a single tribe or nation, but the king of all the earth. Let all the earth rejoice. He is sovereign over all the nations, arrayed in unparalleled regal glory. He is great in royal majesty.

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David Mathis
David Mathis (@davidcmathis) is executive editor at desiringGod.org and an elder at Bethlehem Baptist Church, Minneapolis. He has edited several books, including Thinking. Loving. Doing., Finish the Mission, and Acting the Miracle, and is co-author of How to Stay Christian in Seminary.

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