What I learned About Kid’s Ministry on a VBS Mission Trip to Haiti

What I learned about Kid’s Ministry on a VBS Mission Trip to Haiti

A week ago I had the privilege of leading a VBS team from our church in Haiti.

We were able to share the Gospel with hundreds of kids.

And most important of all we were able to have the pastor of the church where we did the VBS talk with all the kids on the last day and invite them back on Sunday.

Something I’ve learned about short-term mission trips is that Americans can draw a crowd, but it’s indigenous churches who can reach the people long-term.

But God didn’t just work in the hearts of the local kids; he worked in the hearts of our team and more specifically in my heart.

Here are three things God taught me about Kids’ Ministry in the States:

1. Having a lot doesn’t equate to success or contentment.

On one of the first days, I asked the missionary if the average person in Haiti is happy.

I asked this because I found myself thinking about how poor the people were and how terrible their lives must be, but then I began to ask if that was true or was I just projecting my western mindset on them.

The missionary’s responded by saying that from what he observed the average Haitian was happy; they didn’t “need” everything we as Americans “needed” because so many things we take for granted have never even been part of their world.

I was reminded that material possessions don’t equal happiness or success in ministry.

In many ways, lots of things are just distractions from what really matters.

I thought about how I’m always wanting the latest technology in Kids’ Church.

But in the end it isn’t stuff or tech that brings meaning to our services; God can work with whatever we have.

2. Kids everywhere accept people for who they are.

Kids don’t judge or make you feel bad for your eccentricities.

I’ve taught kids in South Africa, South Korea, Haiti and America; and this has held true.

With the kids in Haiti, it didn’t matter that my language was different, my skin color was different, or that my age was different; I was accepted.

As an adult, I want to be more like that.

I want to stop judging parents for what I feel they’re doing wrong.

I want to start showing acceptance to that kid who’s always disruptive; instead of cringing whenever I see them.

3. I want to find more ways for the kids at our church to be involved in missions.

The trip to Haiti reminded me how much God’s people are doing all around the world to share the Gospel and help those who need it most.

I also I noticed that much of the clothing people wore in Haiti was from America.

This inspired me to have a greater passion for Missions and pass it along to the kids at our church.

Our kids can give money to support the work of God.

But they can also donate their old clothes.

They can write letters of encouragement to missionaries.

As Kids’ Pastors, we can do so much more with missions in Kids’ Church to cultivate the hearts of kids and let them feel how connected all God’s people are throughout the earth.

Those are my three biggest takeaways that apply to Kids’ Ministry from my trip to Haiti.

What have you learned on mission trips about Kid’s Ministry?

This article originally appeared here.

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