Home Youth Leaders Articles for Youth Leaders 5 Roles Youth Pastors Play in the Lives of Students

5 Roles Youth Pastors Play in the Lives of Students

We’ve all seen them: articles, videos and lectures given by people who don’t believe youth ministry is necessary or even biblical. While these people certainly are entitled to their opinions, and while most of them are sincerely seeking the most effective and God-honoring way to do ministry, I don’t agree with them. I think youth ministry is necessary. I think it’s biblical. And in some ways, I think it can even be vital.

There are roles a youth worker plays in the lives of our teenagers that can be essential to our students’ spiritual development. 

In most cases, these roles are played out alongside a parent. In some cases, these roles take the place of a parent who can’t or won’t play them. Here are five roles a youth worker can and should play in the lives of the teenagers to whom they minister.

Reinforcer

My daughters listen to their mother. I can offer advice that sometimes goes unheeded. But if my wife says the same thing, they’ll follow it. Funny how that works. We can play the same role in the lives of teenagers. Our message can be the same as their parents. But because it comes from us, a non-parent adult engaged in their life, many times it makes more of an impact. Guess what: This isn’t in spite of their parents; it’s because of it. The best thing we can do as a youth worker is reinforce the biblical values being taught by our teenagers’ parents.

Decompressor

My oldest daughter has begun a mentoring relationship with a youth worker at our church. The last meeting they had together followed a morning where my daughter had found herself on the wrong side of several of our family rules. I know that during her lunch with her mentor she vented some. And you know what? I’m totally OK with that. Teenagers need to blow off steam. You did when you were a teenager. So did I. I love that I am a safe place for my students to vent. We can allow them to decompress in an environment that is supportive of their parents and encouraging of them as individuals.

Confidant

Let’s face it: There are issues that teenagers deal with that they don’t feel comfortable talking with their parents about. As youth workers, we can be a sounding board for these types of issues. A listening ear. A voice of reason. Issues with a boyfriend or girlfriend. Issues with sexual temptation. Relational issues. We can provide advice, prayer and encouragement for issues that so many teenagers just feel weird talking to mom and dad about.

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andy_blanks@churchleaders.com'
Andy Blanks is the co-founder of youthministry360, a ministry committed to equipping youth workers through resources, training, community, and networking. Andy is passionate about God’s Word and the transformation it brings in the lives of God’s people. Andy is a writer, teacher, speaker, and a lifelong Boston Red Sox fan. He lives in Birmingham, AL with his wife and three daughters. Check out Andy’s youth ministry posts on the ym360 Blog (www.youthministry360.com/blog).