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How to Overcome Election Fatigue

Can I just say I am completely worn out with politics in America?

I’m tired of the banter. I’m tired of the insincere promises. I’m tired of the way each side demonizes the other. Honestly, and perhaps this is just the cynic in me, it seems like politics is a game where everyone loses, where the goal is to somehow work to lose a bit less than the “other side.”

I recently wrote another politically charged blog.

It was zesty. It was snarky. It was a bit funny. It was sharp. I would even go so far as to say it had prophetic edge.

But at the same time it was pretty angry, and I’m not confident in my character enough to be able to call it “righteous anger”—so I deleted it. All of it. An hour and a half of typing gone with one keystroke.

Yet here I am again today, writing about politics.

I’ve tried to let as much of the venom go as I possibly can, but forgive me, I’m sure there’s still some there.

Here’s what I want to say to the Church and to believers in this election season—three things specifically:

The kingdom of heaven is neither Republican nor Democrat.

God hasn’t chosen sides. He loves both sides, the red and blue states, and in a very real way he is opposed to both parties and their agendas.

Make no mistake: When the Lord Jesus returns, with his kingdom in tow, he isn’t coming to assume the nomination from this party or that party. No! His kingdom will come, and it will pierce men’s hearts like a sword. His coming, rather than affirming all our political notions, will pierce them.

He will be the King, and he will establish an order never yet seen on the earth.

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adamrussell1@mac.com'
Adam Russell is a worship leader turned pastor. He also leads a worship band known simply as "The Embers." He and his wife, Heather, along with their three children, live and minister in central Kentucky.