Why Didn’t Jesus Do MORE?

Why Didn’t Jesus Do MORE?

I am amazed at all Jesus didn’t do while he was on earth. His public ministry only lasted three years, and in those years, his scope of ministry was incredibly narrow. He is God after all, it seems like he could broaden his scope a little.

Think about all the things Jesus didn’t do:

He didn’t reform the government.

He didn’t solve orphan care.

He didn’t wipe out poverty.

He didn’t improve medical care.

While Jesus taught principles that applied to all of these situations, he could have had an incredible impact in any of these areas. He could have ended abuse by the Romans, he could have launched a system of compassionate care for orphans, he could have ended poverty, or he could have instituted medical practices that would save millions of lives.

But he didn’t.

Though Jesus had the opportunity, resources and ability to address many needs, he limited himself to a very narrow mission: “to seek and save the lost.” Everything he did pointed to that one very succinct task.

He knew that in this fallen world, there will always be hundreds of desperate needs screaming for attention, but only one can be most important.

Although he healed people, fed crowds and occasionally raised the dead, Jesus didn’t make any of those the focal point of his time on earth. He knew the more time he spent focusing on secondary issues, no matter how desperate or urgent, the less time he had for the main thing.

As church leaders, we don’t claim to be God (well most of us), but we act like we can accomplish more than Jesus.

We believe our ministry or our church should be effective in a dozen or more areas. We feel obligated to meet as many needs, to fill as many gaps, to respond to as many crises as possible. How can we say we love God and not feed the hungry, care for the sick, educate the children, fight for the underdog, shelter the homeless, provide for the handicapped and adopt the orphans?

All of this while we promote small groups, conduct church services, perform weddings and funerals, host VBS, send kids to camp, and counsel people in crisis.

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Geoff has served on the leadership teams at Seacoast Church and Saddleback Church, and as Managing Director of Exponential. He is the author of several books, including Together: A Guide for Couples in Ministry written with his wife Sherry. Along with writing, Geoff coaches churches and leaders around the U.S. and in Europe. Geoff lives in Denver, Colorado. Twitter: @geoffsurratt