Home Youth Leaders Articles for Youth Leaders 12 Prayer Stations Ideas for an Interactive Youth Event

12 Prayer Stations Ideas for an Interactive Youth Event

prayer stations ideas

For young followers of Jesus to grow in faith, they need to spend time engaged in Bible study, fellowship with other Christians, and prayer. That’s why church youth groups are so vital to teenagers’ spiritual development. Take prayer time to the next level by incorporating one or more creative prayer stations ideas into your youth ministry programming.

These creative approaches work well to close a regular youth meeting, worship service, small-group meeting, or Bible study session. Another option is to hold a special event devoted solely to these simple prayer stations ideas. The versatile stations also work great for a prayer-themed youth retreat or camp, with young people going on a prayer walk from station to station.

Which prayer stations ideas you use and how you adapt them for your group is up to you. But no matter which you choose, these simple yet powerful options are sure to deepen teens’ relationship with Jesus.

To get started, check out these 12 awesome prayer stations ideas:

1. Creative Connections
prayer station ideas

Set up an art station so young people can color, draw or paint while they talk to God. Coloring sheets work well because teens can doodle and draw without feeling the pressure to create something from scratch. Visual and artistic learners will especially appreciate this station for connecting with God, their Creator.

2. Fishing for People
prayer station ideas

Hang a large piece of netting from the ceiling or wall, and tell youth this prayer station is aimed at people who don’t yet know Jesus. As kids think of a specific person to pray for, have them bend a chenille stem or piece of yarn into the shape of a Christian fish symbol. They can add their “fish” to the net while praying for those individuals—and consider how they might share the good news of the Gospel with them.

3. Pick a Promise
prayer station ideas

Beforehand, write out a bunch of promises from the Bible, each on a separate paper slip. These can be from both the Old and New Testaments. Be sure to have one slip for every youth group member, as well as extras for visitors. During the prayer station time, have teens select a promise and read it to themselves. Then they can spend a few minutes meditating on what the promise means for them right now. Set out notebooks so kids can journal about the promise, if desired.

4. Shine Like Stars
prayer station ideas

On a chalkboard or poster, write out this phrase from Philippians 2:15—“Shine among them like stars in the sky.” Set out yellow construction-paper star shapes and pens. Have group members each take a star and write one or more ways they can shine brightly for Jesus in this dark world. Hang or attach the stars to create a constellation collage so teenagers can see other people’s ideas.

5. Prayers for Healing
prayer station ideas

Beforehand, cut out a person shape from a large sheet of newsprint. Also set out sticky notes and pens. At this prayer station, have kids read Bible passages about healing-related miracles. Then instruct them to jot down prayers for healing—either for others or for themselves. They can stick each prayer note to the related body part or on any portion of the person shape.

6. Floating Prayers
prayer station ideas

Fill a shallow tub or kiddie pool with an inch or two of water. Set out different types and colors of paper, plus scissors and writing instruments. Have kids write down a prayer request or name and then cut and fold the paper into a shape (flowers, hearts, etc.). Next, have them set the shape on the water and pray as they watch their request float around and slowly unfold before God, who hears and answers all our prayers.

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Stephanie Martin, a freelance journalist, has worked in Christian publishing for 28 years. She’s active at her church in Lakewood, Colorado, where she lives with her family.