Home Christian News 2020 Should Be the ‘Year of the Bible,’ Says State Senator

2020 Should Be the ‘Year of the Bible,’ Says State Senator

nathan dahm

Oklahoma state senator Nathan Dahm has filed Senate Concurrent Resolution 7, which, if passed, would declare 2020 the “Year of the Bible.” According to Dahm, the resolution would be a step toward returning to the historical roots of the United States and would benefit the country moving forward. The resolution requests,

The Governor, Executive branch and all subdivisions of this state to designate 2020 as the “Year of the Bible” in the State of Oklahoma in recognition of both the formative influence the Bible has been for our state, and our national need to study and apply the teachings of the Holy Scriptures.

Nathan Dahm on the Importance of the Bible

According to the resolution, the Bible “has made a unique contribution in shaping the United States as a distinctive and blessed nation and people.” Dahm specifically mentions the Bible’s influence on the first settlers, the Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution. He also says the Bible has impacted “many of our great national leaders,” including George Washington, Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, and Woodrow Wilson.  

U.S. history, says Dahm, illustrates the benefit of the Bible’s teachings, teachings we need now as our country faces “great challenges that will test us as we have never been tested before.”

Local 12 News reports that Dahm elaborated on his reasons for filing the resolution: “Second Chronicles 20:20 says ‘Believe in the Lord your God, so shall ye be established.’ As we begin a new era in Oklahoma, I am hopeful this resolution will help people look to truth in 2020 and the years to come.”

Jon Echols, who is the Oklahoma House Majority Floor Leader, has signed on as the House author of Dahm’s resolution. Echols agrees that the Bible’s values have distinguished the United States since our country’s founding, and he believes the principles of Scripture have the ability to bring unity to our divided nation. 

What Do People Think About Nathan Dahm’s Resolution?

Dahm posted about his resolution on Facebook, to mixed reactions.

One person who supported the resolution thanked Dahm for “protecting our fundamental rights.” Another said, “This is part of the reason we voted for you and posted signs to get you elected…you walk in wisdom. This can only make Oklahoma stronger, and a better place to live.”

Others are not so happy, however, and accused Dahm of wasting taxpayer money on an effort that violates the separation of church and state. Some of those who commented were predictably hostile, such as the person who said, “This may be the dumbest thing you’ve ever attempted to pass in our state. Quit playing games and do something useful (and constitutional), bro.” But others were more balanced. 

One user wrote, “As much as I support you and the other Republicans on many issues, I strongly disagree on this one. The government should stay away from religion.” Another said, “While i am a Christian i do however believe in seperation [sic] of church and state lest we become the theocracy we came here to escape.” Several people also took issue with Dahm’s suggestion that the U.S was founded  on biblical principles, stating that many of the founding fathers were deists.

Still others disagreed with Dahm’s decision simply because they believe it is unhelpful. Said one user, “We did not elect you for stuff like this. For believers, each year is the year of the Bible. This does nothing for the Bible or for the people of our state.”

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Jessica Mouser is a writer for churchleaders.com. She has always had a passion for the written word and has been writing professionally for the past two years. She especially enjoys evaluating how various beliefs play out within culture. When Jessica isn't writing, she enjoys playing the piano, reading, and spending time with her friends and family.