Home Outreach Leaders Articles for Outreach & Missions 5 Good Things That Can Come Out of One Bad Virus

5 Good Things That Can Come Out of One Bad Virus

There is nothing “good” about COVID-19. But what good things can come from it?

Instead of only hurting us, how might it help us?

I’m seeing some of the good; you probably are as well.

Easter 2020 was like no other before. The buildings were empty, the message was online, and millions of people heard the good news of Jesus Christ.

This could possibly be the largest reach ever. Prayers continue for millions of salvations world-wide.

One of my prayers for Easter 2020 is that everyone who said yes to the person and message of Jesus would stick to their yes! I pray the Holy Spirit, and the follow up of the church would help each one connect in a genuine and ongoing relationship with their Savior.

The big question is, how will we cultivate the good while we fight the bad during COVID-19?

You may not feel like all five of these “good things” are within your grasp right now.

If only one or two, good! Go for it! It’s not a scoreboard, or performance-oriented, it’s a way of living.

There is nothing “good” about COVID-19.

But what good things can come from it?

Instead of only hurting us, how might it help us?

I’m seeing some of the good; you probably are as well.

Easter 2020 was like no other before. The buildings were empty, the message was online, and millions of people heard the good news of Jesus Christ.

This could possibly be the largest reach ever. Prayers continue for millions of salvations world-wide.

One of my prayers for Easter 2020 is that everyone who said yes to the person and message of Jesus would stick to their yes! I pray the Holy Spirit, and the follow up of the church would help each one connect in a genuine and ongoing relationship with their Savior.

The big question is, how will we cultivate the good while we fight the bad during COVID-19?

You may not feel like all five of these good things are within your grasp right now.

If only one or two, good! Go for it! It’s not a scoreboard, or performance-oriented, it’s a way of living.

2) Community

There is a strong and growing sense that we are all in this together.

Relationships are best in person, but we can still experience a sense of genuine connection through digital platforms.

In the last few weeks, I’ve enjoyed some of the most meaningful phone conversations, social media connects, and facetime chats that I can remember in a long time.

When community and unity increase, division and discord decrease.

Things like division and judging still exist, but those who live there are not extended much credibility.

People are looking for ways to connect, and it’s not just in response to isolation. It’s a deeper recognition of our need for each other.

When we travel through our days at break-neck speeds conquering our to-do lists, it’s possible to lose sight of what together means. It’s difficult to be together when we are always in motion.

We now have the opportunity to find community in the most unique circumstances. It’s not easy with social distancing, but we are finding new ways.

3) Clarity

I don’t like isolation and “shelter in place” any more than you do, but it’s teaching me some things.

My schedule is (surprisingly) very full, but it moves at a slower pace right now. That just means I’m not “running” from one thing to the next. I’m not driving very much, and my transitions are more deliberate.

That time and space allow me to focus better on what is truly important.

  • I’m a new grandfather, “Papa,” in our family. My granddaughter, Anza, has stolen my heart at just two months old. Anza is a beautiful reminder of what is important.
  • My friend Gary, in ICU on a ventilator, reminds me daily about what matters as I pray for him.
  • Jesus meeting me in my prayer room in deep and meaningful ways keeps me centered on what matters to God.

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Dr. Dan Reiland serves as Executive Pastor at 12Stone Church in Lawrenceville, Georgia. He previously partnered with John Maxwell for 20 years, first as Executive Pastor at Skyline Wesleyan Church in San Diego, then as Vice President of Leadership and Church Development at INJOY. He and Dr. Maxwell still enjoy partnering on a number of church related projects together.