Home Podcast Samuel Perry: Are All White Evangelicals Christian Nationalists?

Samuel Perry: Are All White Evangelicals Christian Nationalists?

samuel perry

Dr. Samuel Perry is an award-winning scholar and teacher and a follower of Jesus who cares deeply about the church. Sam joined the Sociology Department of the University of Oklahoma in 2015 after finishing his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. His research explores the interplay of religion and cultural power, and his work has been published in a variety of academic journals in the fields of sociology, religion, and sexuality. Sam has also published three books, including his most recent, co-authored with Andrew Whitehead, entitled “Taking America Back for God: Christian Nationalism in the United States.” Sam is married to Jill, and they have three children.

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christian nationalism

Other Podcasts in the Christian Nationalism Series

Glenn Packiam: The Bible Leaves No Room for Christian Nationalism

Franklin Graham: We Have Never Been a Christian Nation

Timothy Keller: How to Know if You Are a Christian Nationalist

Key Questions for Samuel Perry

-What’s the difference between patriotism and Christian nationalism?

-How does Christian nationalism deviate from following Jesus?

-What percentage of people in evangelical churches would you identify as Christian nationalists?

Key Quotes from Samuel Perry

“One of the unfortunate drawbacks of people talking about [Christian nationalism] a lot on social media…is you have a lot of people throwing around the term and who aren’t able to define it well and it ends up being a catch-all term for conservative Christians or someone who wants their faith to impact their values and politics, and that’s not at all what we mean by that term.”

“When we talk about Christian nationalism, we’re talking about an ideology that idealizes and advocates a fusion of American civic life with a very particular kind of Christianity.”

“Christian nationalism often behaves in the exact opposite direction that we understand traditional faith commitments to do.”

“People who hold more strongly Christian nationalist views are more likely to hold what we would consider irrationally fearful attitudes towards Muslims, towards Jewish Americans, towards atheists…and to see them as enemies.”

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As Vice President of Ministry Mobilization for Outreach, Inc., Jason dedicates his time to encouraging and equipping churches, denominations and ministry organizations to develop their Kingdom effectiveness by creating a culture that is both incarnational and invitational. He also serves as the Executive Director of the National Back to Church Sunday movement and hosts the weekly ChurchLeaders podcast. Jason lives on Anastasia Island, Florida, with his beautiful wife and children. Connect with him on Twitter and Instagram @jasondaye